Dentist - St Johns
2220 CR 210 West, Suite 312
St Johns, FL 32259
(904) 825-9960

(904) 825-9960
2220 CR 210 West, Suite 312
St Johns, FL 32259

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By St. Johns Dental
March 08, 2019
Category: Oral Health
ADentalExamCouldUncoveranEatingDisorder

After your son or daughter's dental exam, you expect to hear about cavities, poor bites or other dental problems. But your dentist might suggest a different kind of problem you didn't expect—an eating disorder.

It's not a fluke occurrence—a dental exam is a common way bulimia nervosa or anorexia nervosa come to light. That's because the teeth are often damaged by the behaviors of a patient with an eating disorder.

Most of this damage occurs because of purging, the practice of induced vomiting after eating. During vomiting stomach acid can enter the mouth and "wash" against the back of the teeth. After repeated episodes, the acid dissolves the mineral content of tooth enamel and causes it to erode. There's also a tell-tale pattern with eating disorders: because the tongue partially shields the back of the lower teeth while purging, the lower teeth may show less enamel erosion than the upper.

Hygiene practices, both negligent and too aggressive, can accelerate erosion. Anorexics often neglect basic grooming and hygiene like brushing and flossing, which increases the likelihood of dental disease. Bulimia patients, on the other hand, can be fastidious about their hygiene. They're more likely to brush immediately after purging, which can cause tiny bits of the enamel immediately softened by the acid wash to slough off.

In dealing with a family member's eating disorder, you should consider both a short and long-term approach to protect their dental health. In the sort-term the goal is to treat the current damage and minimize the extent of any future harm. In that regard, encourage them to rinse with water (mixed optionally with baking soda to help neutralize acid) after purging, and wait an hour before brushing. This will give saliva in the mouth a chance to fully neutralize any remaining acid. Your dentist may also recommend a sodium fluoride mouth rinse to help strengthen their tooth enamel.

For the long-term, your goal should be to help your loved one overcome this potentially life-threatening condition through counseling and therapy. To find out more about treatment resources near you, visit the National Eating Disorders Association website at nationaleatingdisorders.org. Taking steps to treat an eating disorder could save not only your loved one's dental health, but also their life.

If you would like more information on eating disorders and dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bulimia, Anorexia & Oral Health.”

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Dr. John Joyner

Dr. Joyner established St Johns Dental as a cosmetic and family dental practice in 2003.  His goal is to provide high quality dentistry and a caring, gentle environment for his patients.  Dr. Joyner grew up in Mississippi where his father was a United Methodist minister.  Dr. Joyner graduated from the University of Mississippi School of Dentistry in 1991. He is currently also an Instructor for the University of Florida Dental School.  He supervises dental students as they complete their clinical rotations at The Sulzbacher Center in Jacksonville Beach, FL.

Read more about Dr. John Joyner

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