Dentist - St Johns
2220 CR 210 West, Suite 312
St Johns, FL 32259
(904) 825-9960

(904) 825-9960
2220 CR 210 West, Suite 312
St Johns, FL 32259

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Posts for tag: dentures

Implant-SupportedDenturesCouldContributetoBetterBoneHealth

For generations, dentures have helped people avoid the dire consequences of total teeth loss. Now, implant technology is making them even better.

Composed of life-like prosthetic teeth fixed within a plastic or resin gum-colored base, dentures are manufactured to fit an individual patient’s mouth for maximum fit, comfort and performance. But dentures also have a critical drawback—they can’t stop bone loss in the jaw.

Bone is constantly regenerating as older cells dissolve and then are replaced by newer cells. In the jawbone, the forces generated when we chew travel through the teeth to the bone and help stimulate this new cell growth. When teeth are missing, though, the bone doesn’t receive this stimulus and may not regenerate at a healthy rate, resulting in gradual bone loss.

Dentures can’t transmit this chewing stimulus to the bone. In fact, the pressure they produce as they rest on top of the gums may actually accelerate bone loss. Over time then, a denture’s once secure and comfortable fit becomes loose.

In the past, most patients with loose dentures have had them relined with new dental material to improve fit, or have new dentures created to conform to the changed contours of the jaws. But implant technology now offers another alternative.

Implants are in essence a tooth root replacement. Dentists surgically implant a titanium metal post directly into the jawbone that naturally attracts bone cells to grow and adhere to it over time (a process called osseointegration). This not only creates a secure and lasting hold, it can also stop or even reverse bone loss.

Most people know implants as single tooth replacements with a porcelain crown attached to the titanium post. But a few strategically placed implants can also support either removable or fixed dentures. Removable dentures (also called overdentures) usually need only 3 or 4 implants on the top jaw and 2 on the bottom jaw for support through built-in connectors in the dentures that attach to the implants. A fixed bridge may require 4-6 implants to which they are permanently attached.

There are pros and cons for each of these options and they’re both more expensive than traditional dentures. In the long run, though, implant-supported dentures could be more beneficial for your bone health and hold their fit longer.

If you would like more information on implant-supported dental work, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By St. Johns Dental
November 15, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dentures   oral health  
TakeYourDenturesoutatNighttoExtendTheirUsefulness

There's no doubt about it — dentures have changed your life. Now you can eat and speak normally, and smile again with confidence. But if you're going to continue to benefit from your dentures, you'll need to take care of them. One of the best things you can do is not sleep with them in.

There are a couple of important reasons why you should take your dentures out when you go to bed. First, dentures tend to compress the bony ridges of the gums that support them. This contributes to the loss of the underlying bone, an occurrence common with missing teeth. Wearing dentures around the clock can accelerate this bone loss, which eventually loosens your denture fit.

Constant denture wearing also contributes to mouth conditions conducive to dental disease. You're more likely to develop tongue and denture plaque (a thin film of bacteria and food particles) that can cause gum inflammation or yeast development. The presence of the latter could also trigger a chronic response from your immune system that might make you more susceptible to other diseases.

Good oral hygiene is just as important with dentures as with natural teeth. Besides removing them at night, you should also take them out and rinse them after eating and brush them at least once a day with a soft tooth brush. And be sure to use regular dish or hand soap (especially antibacterial) or denture cleanser — toothpaste is too abrasive for denture surfaces.

It's also a good habit to store your dentures in water or, better, an alkaline peroxide solution. This will help deter plaque and yeast development. And don't forget the rest of your mouth: brush your tongue and gums with a very soft toothbrush (different from your denture brush) or clean them off with a damp cloth.

Taking care of your dentures will ensure two things. You'll lower your risk for disease — and you'll also help extend your dentures' life and fit.

If you would like more information on caring for your dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

AnImplant-SupportedDentureOffersaNumberofAdvantages

If you’ve had the misfortune of losing all or most of your teeth (a condition called edentulism), you still have effective options for restoring lost form and function to your mouth. There is, of course, the traditional removable denture that’s been the mainstay for edentulism treatment for decades. If you haven’t experienced significant bone loss in the jaw, though, a fixed bridge supported by titanium implants could be a better choice.

But what if bone loss has ruled out an implant-supported fixed bridge? There’s still another option besides traditional dentures — a removable “overdenture” that fits “over” smaller diameter implants strategically placed in the jaw to support it.

A removable, implant-supported bridge offers a number of advantages for edentulism patients with significant bone loss.

Speech Enhancement. Any denture or bridge supported by implants will have a positive impact on speech ability, especially involving the upper jaw. But patients who’ve previously worn removable dentures may not see a dramatic difference but will still be able to benefit from the greater stability of the denture, particularly if the dentures were previously unstable.

Hygiene. A removable denture allows better access to implant sites for cleaning. Better hygiene reduces the risk of gum disease and further bone loss.

Long-Term Maintenance. Regardless of which type of implant supported restoration is used, it will eventually require some maintenance. A well-designed removable overdenture can make any future maintenance easier to perform.

Aesthetics. For personal satisfaction, this is often the ultimate test — how will I look? As a product of the evolving art of facial aesthetics, removable dentures supported by implants can replace lost tissues and restore balance to the face, and often produce a remarkable smile “makeover.”

To find out which restoration option is best for you, you should first undergo a thorough examination to determine the status of your facial and jaw structures, particularly the amount of bone mass still present. Ultimately, though, the decision should be the one that best fits your functional needs, while fulfilling your desires for your future smile.

If you would like more information on tooth restoration options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fixed vs. Removable: Choosing Between a Removable Bridge and a Fixed Bridge.”

By St. Johns Dental
March 03, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
LooseDentures-NoMore

The image of Grandma and Grandpa taking out their dentures every night and placing them in a glass of water by the bed is still a reality for a lot of people.

If you have dentures, you probably know that the conditions in your mouth will or have changed over time, necessitating adjustments. This is because full dentures exert continuous pressure on the gum tissues and underlying bone of your jaw resulting in a slow shrinkage. The gum tissues, and the bone beneath, atrophy or melt away. The result — over time the dentures lose their original tight fit and become loose. This can cause discomfort and embarrassment as the dentures slip and slide around.

Reline (refit) your current dentures. If your dentures are in good condition and are functional, applying a new inner lining to the dentures will restore their former fit. Because the rate of bone loss differs from person to person, some denture wearers may need more frequent relines than others. A temporary reline involves adding a layer of moldable plastic material under the denture while you are in the dentist's chair. The material will harden and fill in spaces where the gums have shrunk away from the denture. For a more permanent relining, the dentures must be sent to a dental lab, which will replace the temporary material with permanent denture material. This can usually be done in one day.

A new set of dentures. If your dentures are worn or you cannot speak, eat, bite or chew properly with them, a new set of dentures may be the answer. The condition of your jaw is another factor. If examination shows that a reline will not achieve the fit and stability you need, then remaking the dentures is another option.

Dental Implants — State-of-the-art tooth replacement systems. Dentures used to be the only solution to the problem of missing teeth, but with today's technology it's amazing what dentists can do. Implants do not only replace teeth but also stabilize the gradual bone loss that takes place when teeth are missing. Choose dental implants to replace at least two of your missing teeth to anchor your dentures and make them more stable.

Have all your missing teeth replaced with dental implants. Dental implants are generally the best option for long-term denture wearers who have endured jawbone loss and can no longer tolerate dentures alone. Bridgework (or dentures) are attached to the implants, stabilizing them and the underlying bone. The new teeth also provide support to the face, lips and cheeks giving a more youthful appearance.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about dentures and other tooth restorations. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Loose Dentures.”

ScienceandArtPartnersinCraftingaSuperiorSetofDentures

Edentulism — the complete loss of all the permanent teeth — is a condition that affects over one-quarter of all Americans over the age of 65. For many seniors, it can be a devastating blow to their confidence and self-image. Worse, if left untreated, it may lead to nutritional problems, periodontal disease, and bone loss.

Fortunately, an affordable, time-tested treatment option is available: full denture prosthetics, or false teeth. Denture technology has changed over time, but one aspect of the process remains the same: making a superior set of dentures requires an equal blend of science and art.

To replicate the look of a patient's natural teeth, a dentist must make many choices: What size should the new teeth be? How much of them should show above the gum line? How should they be spaced? Photographs of the patient before tooth loss can help in making the decisions. We will use these, combined with clinical acumen and an artist's eye, to achieve the best aesthetic results.

But dentures not only simulate the teeth and gums they replace — they also help support the facial skeleton and the soft tissues of the lips and cheeks. Balancing the muscular forces of the jaws and tongue, they help restore natural functions like speech and eating. In order to perform these tasks properly, it is essential that they be well crafted.

At each stage of their progress, from temporary wax rims through the hard plastic resins of the final product, the dentures are carefully custom-fitted to the contours of the patient's mouth. Their bite must be balanced, meaning that upper and lower dentures come together to properly stabilize each other. This ensures that they will be comfortable to wear and will function properly.

Most people have only minor issues as they make the adjustment to wearing dentures; but for some, it's more troublesome. There are various options available to those patients, including implant-supported hybrid dentures. We can recommend alternatives based on your individual needs and preferences.

If you would like more information about dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removable Full Dentures.”



Dr. John Joyner

Dr. Joyner established St Johns Dental as a cosmetic and family dental practice in 2003.  His goal is to provide high quality dentistry and a caring, gentle environment for his patients.  Dr. Joyner grew up in Mississippi where his father was a United Methodist minister.  Dr. Joyner graduated from the University of Mississippi School of Dentistry in 1991. He is currently also an Instructor for the University of Florida Dental School.  He supervises dental students as they complete their clinical rotations at The Sulzbacher Center in Jacksonville Beach, FL.

Read more about Dr. John Joyner

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